Tag Archives: statistics

Case-fatality rates don’t indicate how well a country contained COVID

Recently, I have been frequently seeing the argument that the USA has actually done a very good job at dealing with COVID because it’s case-fatality rate (i.e., the percentage of infected individuals that die from COVID) is lower than many … Continue reading

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What does “statistically significant” mean?

Lately, social media has been flooded with people sharing studies about various aspects of COVID. This is potentially great. I’m all for people being more engaged with science. Unfortunately, many people lack a good foundation for understanding science, and a … Continue reading

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Increased testing does not explain the increase in US COVID cases

The US is experiencing another sharp increase in COVID19 cases. This is a simple fact, but as always seems to be the case in today’s world, this fact is being treated as an opinion. Countless people (including prominent politicians and … Continue reading

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When can correlation equal causation?

“Correlation does not equal causation.” It is a phrase that everyone has probably heard, but many people seem to ignore or misunderstand it. Indeed, although useful, the phrase itself can be misleading because it often leads to the misconception that … Continue reading

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Basic Statistics Part 6: Confounding Factors and Experimental Design

The topic of confounding factors is extremely important for understanding experimental design and evaluating published papers. Nevertheless, confounding factors are poorly understood among the general public, and even professional scientists often fail to appropriately account for them, which results in … Continue reading

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