Tag Archives: evaluating evidence

What does “statistically significant” mean?

Lately, social media has been flooded with people sharing studies about various aspects of COVID. This is potentially great. I’m all for people being more engaged with science. Unfortunately, many people lack a good foundation for understanding science, and a … Continue reading

Posted in Nature of Science | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

Science is a path to knowledge

There are a lot of misconceptions about what science actually is, and, as a result, there are a lot of incorrect conclusions about the reliability and utility of science. I frequently encounter people who expect science to give absolute answers. … Continue reading

Posted in Nature of Science | Tagged , | 29 Comments

The problem with “just asking questions”

Asking questions is generally a good thing. Indeed, questions are the very foundation of science. People become scientists because they are curious and like to ask questions, and science itself is simply a systematic method for asking and answering questions. … Continue reading

Posted in Rules of Logic | Tagged , | 6 Comments

More anti-vaccine cherry-picking: A rebuttal to, “Should you be afraid that measles can give you immune amnesia?”

Earlier this week, I wrote a post about measles-induced “immune amnesia” and the growing body of evidence supporting it. Afterwards, I was directed to an anti-vaccine “rebuttal” to this evidence (not to my post specifically) which has been making its … Continue reading

Posted in Vaccines/Alternative Medicine | Tagged , , , , | 13 Comments

How to find and access peer-reviewed studies (for free)

The peer-reviewed literature is where scientists publish their research, and it is the source for scientific information. As a result, I spend a lot of time on this blog talking about it. I have explained how the peer-review system works … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments